4K Cameras: Camera, Lens Combination Crucial in Handling Tough Lighting

With the upgrade to 720p, then to 1080p, and now 4K and beyond – that makes for far greater detail to be shown to your audience. This leads to the need for greater detail being paid to what you are capturing.

4K Cameras: Camera, Lens Combination Crucial in Handling Tough Lighting
This picture of a child with two glasses, shows the inside exposure versus outside using a Canon DSLR camera.
4K Cameras: Camera, Lens Combination Crucial in Handling Tough Lighting
This picture of a child with two glasses, shows the inside exposure versus outside using a Canon DSLR camera.

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4K Cameras: Camera, Lens Combination Crucial in Handling Tough Lighting

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The new industry buzzwords sure do catch us, don’t they?

How much bandwidth does it take to stream 4K? A lot – simply put.

If we are talking audio, then line array is all the rage.

Or in lighting, it’s all about LEDs – let alone video display, where it’s all about lasers and LEDs.

So how do you make sense of it all, and know what is right for you? I’ll put the spoiler right here at the top of the article – work with someone who is well experienced, that you trust will be able to educate you, and will lead you through the process of either getting into or upgrading your technology systems.

Especially camera systems.

When it comes to cameras – there is not just one style “best” for all scenarios. Many churches, though, tend to have very similar situations, which makes discussing cameras (or other AV tech) pretty repeatable on church-related Facebook groups like Church Sound – Media Techs or Visual Church Media.

Back in February, I wrote a fairly technical article about cameras, which was quite in depth about how a 3-chip or a single chip camera works. In that comparison, was an image showing the low light performance of different cameras. If you are in a well-lit area, the differences tend to be less stark, but in most house of worship environments, the light level is often a struggle for cameras.

Another point to be aware of is the great difference between the human eye and the camera.

Imagine sitting in a fairly dark dining establishment with your friends, and someone whips out their cellphone camera to capture the moment, but you are sitting against a window with daylight streaming through.

What happens to the image?

One of two things – you either get the inside photo that turns out and the out-the-window is completely washed out, or the opposite, where the outside is in focus and well-lit and the group of friends are all dark.

The human eye doesn’t have that problem, so why does a camera? Well, let’s just say that God is a better designer than we as humans are.

Cameras only have a limited amount of dynamic range, and their ability to “see” the inside or outside is largely controlled by the iris on the lens, which lets in more or less light. Secondarily, the shutter speed affects this, as does the ISO, but to not overcomplicate this article – the point here is that you need to choose a camera and lens combination that will perform well in your environment.


More About Stefan Svard
Stefan Svard has been involved with the A/V world for virtually all of his life. His first experience dates back to when he was 13 years old, and fast forward to the present. He now has the opportunity to serve a much larger base of people through his company, Audio Video Electronics, a Minneapolis-based AVL systems integrator, which specializes in sound systems, acoustic design, sound transmission isolation, video systems and lighting systems.
Get in Touch: ssvard@audiovideoelectronics.com    More by Stefan Svard

Latest Resource

For Lighting Design, What Software Is The Right Match For Your Needs? (Part 3)
Dig into this final part of a three-part series that looks into choices for lighting design software, including Vectorworks and LightConverse, and how each can best serve the needs of your church.


Article Topics

Technology · Video · Projection · Visual Arts · Video Production · Team Management · Budgeting · 4K Camcorders · Audio · Bandwidth · Cameras · Church Sound · Churches · All Topics

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