Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

The applications for the bouncing-toddler illustration have grown exponentially in recent years, into a way of thinking about music in general; giving a clear goal to work toward when crafting a band’s sonic quality.

Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.
Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.

Technology News

Kinetic Lighting: Offering Numerous Options For Design
Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
Acoustical Treatments: When Selecting Panels, Look to Absorption
Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
·

There is a myriad of practical applications from this illustration to how a band should be directed musically and how the band’s sound ought to be mixed. With any team I am instructing, in this order of priority, I work with purpose to:
1) consolidate the song’s melody and unify the vocal style of the singers,
2) make sure all vocalists are singing the same lyrics (and that they match the screens!),
3) establish solid time-keeping and melody-supporting parts for drums and bass guitar,
4) establish other instrumental parts that support, but never clutter the melody,
5) make sure any harmony vocals are used sparingly and mixed lower than the melody, and
6) ensure an overall mix that has clearly audible melody, supported by robust low end.

What does this mean, in practical terms, to you, an audio technician? You may feel that only item #6 on the list above, is within your domain. That’s the only one you’re responsible for. You just mix, as best as you can, whatever they’re sending you. The rest, surely, is up to the people on the platform!

I would beg to differ, though. Your input is needed!

Most audio technicians that I know and have worked with - especially in church music situations - are very humble, unassuming people. They probably would not offer an opinion about the band’s singing and playing unless asked. They may not give their real opinion, even if they were asked. Maybe they tried in the past, only to be ignored. They’ve given up!

But the audio technician has the most objective ears in the room. There might be things happening musically - negative things - that the instrumentalists and singers, and even the Musical Director (MD), are unaware of.

If we can all agree that we are aiming for the bouncing-boy-on-a-bed sound, then we can communicate more freely, as we move toward that agreed goal.

The audio tech and the MD must work together to make that possible.

As an audio tech, ask yourself these questions:

• Can you hear vocalists singing with mismatching interpretations of the melody, vocal styles or lyrics from each other? This is a big problem. Not just for the audio tech, not just for the singers, but for the whole congregation! You need one solid, consistent, unified, consolidated representation of the melody - hopefully from at least one female and one male voice - so that you can give that vocal melody the prominence and clarity in the mix that it needs. Are you unable to find the correctly focused “picture” of the bouncing boy? Ask for that to be rectified.


More About Grant Norsworthy
A Grammy-nominated, Dove Award-winning musician, Grant Norsworthy is also the founder, owner, content developer and principal instructor of More Than Music Mentor, helping to equip church singers, instrumentalists and technicians for artistic excellence and authentic worship.
Get in Touch: me@grantnorsworthy.com    More by Grant Norsworthy

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Technology · Audio · Team Management · Leadership · Team Development · Volunteers · Congregation · Drums · Elements · Foundational · Frequencies · Lyrics · All Topics

Support and Enhance the Worship Message

The latest strategies for sound, lighting and facilities can help you better attract and engage with your congregation. With Worship Facilities’ insights on leadership, communication and administrative tools, each issue shows you how to design and maintain your facility and how to adapt it to meet the changing needs of today’s members.
Explore the success stories of others, and find ways to enhance your weekly services. Get a free subscription to Worship Facilities magazine.

Comments


Editor's Picks
©2018 WFX Network · A division of Informa · 1166 Avenue of the Americas, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10036 · All Rights Reserved.