Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

The applications for the bouncing-toddler illustration have grown exponentially in recent years, into a way of thinking about music in general; giving a clear goal to work toward when crafting a band’s sonic quality.

Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.
Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.

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Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
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• Are the drums and bass inconsistent, mushy, and not together? Are tempos wandering? Is there a tug-of-war between different instruments about where the beat is? Then you won’t be able to have the mattress for the boy to bounce on. Make this known to the MD. Get it fixed, or at least worked on.
• Are any of the instruments throwing pillows in front of the little boy’s face? Are they playing parts, with a volume level or tone that makes it difficult to give the necessary clarity to the vocal melody? Speak up!
• Are harmony vocals keeping you guessing about which vocalists are singing the melody? If you’re working with a group of singers, you’ll probably find that they want to sing harmonies a lot, and they’ll change who gets to do them from time to time. This makes it difficult to consistently keep the melody more prominent than the harmony vocals. If you’re uncertain about which vocalists are carrying the melody, speak to the MD. Work out a system so that you can always be sure and mix accordingly. My system: Decide on at least one male and one female singer to sing melody for the whole service. Any additional singers might sing melody as well, but when harmony is utilized, you’ll know which mic lines to have mixed a little lower than your main melody mics. Make it as simple as possible. Mixing sound is tough enough, without having to juggle a bunch of harmony-happy vocalists at the same time!

This is all dependent, of course, on a smooth, productive, clear flow of communication from console to platform and platform to console.

I hope you have a great working relationship with the MD, and all the members of the team on the platform. Do they ask for your opinion? They may not think to do so. Most likely, that communication and relationship has room for improvement.

If you’re looking for somewhere to start with the process, share the idea of the bouncing-boy-on-the-bed and how it relates to the overall sound that meets the ears of the congregation. Maybe share this article and photo with the MD. The whole team. Get on the same page with what sort of sound we are aiming for, and then move from there to speak about specifics.

This bouncing-boy-on-the-bed way of thinking about sound and music can help the whole team. Instrumentalists, singers and audio technicians alike can agree on a defined objective for our sound. This, in turn, can help each individual make better musical choices, and encourage the whole team to work together more effectively to achieve the agreed goal.




More About Grant Norsworthy
A Grammy-nominated, Dove Award-winning musician, Grant Norsworthy is also the founder, owner, content developer and principal instructor of More Than Music Mentor, helping to equip church singers, instrumentalists and technicians for artistic excellence and authentic worship.
Get in Touch: me@grantnorsworthy.com    More by Grant Norsworthy

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Technology · Audio · Team Management · Leadership · Team Development · Volunteers · Drums · Elements · Foundational · Frequencies · Lyrics · Melody · All Topics

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