Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

The applications for the bouncing-toddler illustration have grown exponentially in recent years, into a way of thinking about music in general; giving a clear goal to work toward when crafting a band’s sonic quality.

Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.
Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band
A picture of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.

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Audio Production: The Boy, The Bed and The Band

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
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My sons love bouncing on their parents’ bed, and I have learned a lot from watching them! It seems that at age three, it’s the optimal age for this activity. Old enough to bounce, without falling off the edge. Small enough not to damage the bed! First it was our oldest, Max, then the middle son, Marcus, and right now, it’s our youngest, Casper.

Think of the bouncing boy as the vocal melody and the lyric of the song.

The picture to the right – of my 3-year-old boy bouncing on a queen size bed – reminded me of my musical choices as the bassist and backing singer with bands like PC3 (Paul Colman Trio) and Sonicflood.

These days, though, I’m more often in the role of instructor and consultant for whole teams of church instrumentalists, singers and technicians: Helping them craft a sound that is more inviting and engaging for the congregation.

The applications for the bouncing-toddler illustration have grown exponentially in recent years, into a way of thinking about music in general; giving a clear goal to work toward when crafting a band’s sonic quality, that effectively engages a church congregation to worship God through songs.

Picture this: My 3-year-old son Casper leaping exuberantly through the air, arms flailing, face beaming, propelled by his little legs, springing off mommy and daddy’s bed. It’s an engaging picture. It draws people in.

Think of the bouncing boy as the vocal melody and the lyric of the song. That’s the most important element of this picture and of our song. That’s what we are asking people to connect with, resonate with, sing along to.

The bed that Casper is bouncing on has two halves - mommy’s side and daddy’s side. These two halves of one whole in our band’s sound are the bass guitar and the drums - more specifically the kick drum. The parts being played by these two must be connected, solid, foundational and support the vocal melody and lyrics. They allow the boy to bounce!

The lower frequencies of these instruments, when mixed correctly, have the power to move people, shift air, create a vibe and groove for the music, while never invading the frequency range - the sonic space - of the song’s melody. Given a suitable sound system, lower frequencies can be put to dynamic use, while never making the band sound too loud or hurting any ears.

There are other elements to the picture - comforter, pillows, wall hangings and so on - that add interest and color to the overall picture. But the little boy will bounce without them. These are our guitars, keyboards, harmony vocals and any other instrumentation we might add. Any one of them is not essential to the success or failure of the song. They must not clutter the sonic space of the melody and the lyrics. Unless there is an instrumental passage to a song, they must never compete for the attention of the listener.


More About Grant Norsworthy
A Grammy-nominated, Dove Award-winning musician, Grant Norsworthy is also the founder, owner, content developer and principal instructor of More Than Music Mentor, helping to equip church singers, instrumentalists and technicians for artistic excellence and authentic worship.
Get in Touch: me@grantnorsworthy.com    More by Grant Norsworthy

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Technology · Audio · Team Management · Leadership · Team Development · Volunteers · Audio Production · Bassist · Congregation · Drums · Elements · Foundational · All Topics

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