For Live Video Director, 3 Key Roles Determined By State of Their Heart

The job must be to tell the story that the worship team and pastor are giving from the stage.

For Live Video Director, 3 Key Roles Determined By State of Their Heart
While a live video director is a storyteller, the catch is that it's not their story that they are telling: it's someone else's.
For Live Video Director, 3 Key Roles Determined By State of Their Heart
While a live video director is a storyteller, the catch is that it's not their story that they are telling: it's someone else's.

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For Live Video Director, 3 Key Roles Determined By State of Their Heart

Team Management Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
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Firesheets WFX 2017

Justin was a speaker at WFX this year in Dallas. For 2018, the conference is slated for Orlando in November. We hope to see you there.

Earlier this week, there were excellent articles posted on Worship Tech Director regarding the key roles and responsibilities of a video director, both in a live worship setting and in the creative, post-production world.

But while technical skill is crucial, it’s often a person’s heart that ends up having the greatest influence on their actions.

I believe there are three key roles of a live video director that are ultimately determined by the state of their heart.

In the director chair, it can often become easy to let our own styles and prejudices influence how we call a show.

First, a live video director is a storyteller. But the catch is that it’s not their story that they are telling: it’s someone else’s.

In the director chair, it can often become easy to let our own styles and prejudices influence how we call a show. What types of camera shots we use, what movements we call, and what transitions we execute can all happen out of our opinion that “our way” is the best way.

However, at the end of the day, it’s not about my personal style preferences. My job is to tell the story that the worship team and pastor are giving from the stage.

If the worship team is doing a slow, intimate song, then my shot selection, pace, and timing need to match the intimacy of the moment and blend well with the rhythm that the worship team is dictating.

If the pastor feels that certain shots are distracting, it doesn’t matter how cool I think they are. I need to submit to his leadership and honor his request to not use them.

The worship experience isn’t mine to own.

At my church, where I’ve been on staff for the last seven years, our team has a common saying: the ministry need determines the tech response. In essence, the ministries get the chance to drive the vision, and it’s our job to help implement that vision in the best way possible, regardless of how we feel about it.

At that point, I have to lay down all of my own preferences or style and understand that my job is to bring my team and our technology in alignment with the vision of those leading the church.

Secondly, a video director is a thermostat, not a thermometer. When it comes to my attitude or emotions, I need to set the temperature of the booth, not reflect it.


More About Justin Firesheets
Justin Firesheets has been the Production Manager at Church of the Highlands since February 2009 after having spent the previous six years working in the sports broadcasting industry. He is responsible for the management of the video systems, volunteer teams, and equipment at all 16 Highlands campuses, as well as serving as the project manager for all AVL areas on capital projects. He is passionate about teaching leadership development, systems management, and personal growth to those in the church technology world. Firesheets lives in Birmingham, Ala. with his wife and two children.
Get in Touch: firesheets@churchofthehighlands.com    More by Justin Firesheets

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Team Management · Leadership · Spiritual Health · Team Development · Audio Engineer · Camera Operator · Post Production · Proverbs · Video Director · Worship Team · All Topics

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