Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

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Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.
Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.

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Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

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We rushed to get everything finished. Go figure, some of the equipment did not function as planned.

Long story short, it was a tough job with tough timelines, that ended up where no one was happy.

This is what I call a negative outcome.

I remember this job specifically, because I remember getting questioned on every decision I made relating to that project. An analysis was made after the fact, and it was made without knowledge of the factors leading up to the design. There were good reasons for the decisions I made, and documentation to support the design, but they were ultimately poor decisions. 

Being busy is not the only factor that can cause problems to arise for a system designer.

The other is the client.

I believe I can say this, because I now find myself on the client side of a job. It is our job to define the use case of a room. It is our job to know what we want to do in a room, so we can give the system designer insight into what our expectations are. While this is generally pretty common language, it really does allow the designer to take common language and translate it to a workable design.

This initial conversation, in my opinion, is actually one of the most important conversations pertaining to a project and its success. The rest of the project will likely fall under false assumptions, if this portion is not conducted appropriately.

During one project, for example, the client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, and felt strongly that it was required for their needs. When the dust settled, the room was deemed to suit everything from a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting space for 30 people.

The client came up with well over 20 unique use cases for the room.

The project ultimately came together in a good way, all things considered, but it was not because of the initial conversations.

It was despite them.

It caused a lot of time at the end working long, late hours to try and make everything work. A week extra on the front end can save multiple weeks on the back end.


More About Tom Noble
Tom Noble received his Bachelor of Science in Acoustics from Columbia College in Chicago. During college, he served as a researcher for the Army Corps of Engineers with a specific focus on Low-Frequency Propagation. After college, he owned his own company working with churches and other AV clients. One of his favorite jobs during that time was being able to design and build a recording studio in downtown Nashville. Shortly after, he worked for an integrator, doing work all over the country, specializing in DSP programming and tuning of rooms for many churches and large corporate clients. He is now the head AV design engineer for Lifeway Christian Resources in Nashville. He is married to his beautiful wife with an amazing son and beautiful little daughter.
Get in Touch: tom.noble@lifeway.com    More by Tom Noble

Latest Resource

For Lighting Design, What Software Is The Right Match For Your Needs? (Part 3)
Dig into this final part of a three-part series that looks into choices for lighting design software, including Vectorworks and LightConverse, and how each can best serve the needs of your church.


Article Topics

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