Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

It is in our nature to look at other people’s work, to learn and to analyze. Learn by taking tours of other facilities, installing other people’s designs, and even when installing your own designs.

Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.
Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design
For one project, a client had a very difficult time nailing down a use case for a room. In part, it was because the organization had crafted many use cases spanning multiple disciplines. Each section of the organization had its own vision for the room, ranging from a space for a live event with a band, a banquet hall, and a video conference meeting room for 30 people.

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Learn From The Experience of Others When Choosing A Design

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The project also had a lot of physical restrictions, making it very difficult to please each of the groups. This caused a good deal of criticism from multiple fronts. Most of the people doling out the criticism did not understand the full extent use case of the room, or the design restrictions placed on the room. 

Finally, I set aside time to tour a facility that implemented conference rooms in a very similar fashion to what I planned. During the tour, I got to lay eyes on some of the equipment that I had specified.

Because most of the equipment was new, I had not seen a lot of it in the wild. This may seem trivial, but it turned out to be a very important detail, when it came to the aesthetic of the design.

The biggest change item was the … drum roll … camera mount.

It sounds small, but when we saw it in person, everyone in the group hated the way the mount looked. Had I gone with the standard mount that came with the camera, I would have had 30 rooms where a mount would have gotten negative and unwanted attention.

Because of this tour, we were pushed to look at an additional mount that looked more slimline, and disappeared behind the camera. It was a very small change in the grand scheme of things, but really made the difference in appearance of the room.

On the books already are other companies in the midst of projects, who have opted to do the same thing. They will tour our facility and look at our designs to decide what they like and what they don’t.

I know they will ask a lot of questions, but that is the benefit of a tour. They can learn from the experience of others.

When we look at different designs, it’s important to remember that there is likely a set of circumstances that led to a particular decision. It could be that someone is overworked and doing the best they can with the resources available. It could be that the client gave no clear direction, or even specifically said they wanted something that did not fall in line with the project’s goals. There are many reasons, but there are also lots of good things that can come out of viewing other designs. Viewing other designs can provide insight and a learning experience that otherwise can only be gained after years of practice.




More About Tom Noble
Tom Noble received his Bachelor of Science in Acoustics from Columbia College in Chicago. During college, he served as a researcher for the Army Corps of Engineers with a specific focus on Low-Frequency Propagation. After college, he owned his own company working with churches and other AV clients. One of his favorite jobs during that time was being able to design and build a recording studio in downtown Nashville. Shortly after, he worked for an integrator, doing work all over the country, specializing in DSP programming and tuning of rooms for many churches and large corporate clients. He is now the head AV design engineer for Lifeway Christian Resources in Nashville. He is married to his beautiful wife with an amazing son and beautiful little daughter.
Get in Touch: tom.noble@lifeway.com    More by Tom Noble

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