Once Finished, Make Intro Video Easy to Share, Find

After shooting and editing the video, feature it on your website and Facebook page. This video will be one of your church’s main front doors, so treat it that way.

Once Finished, Make Intro Video Easy to Share, Find
A screen grab of the intro video showing the coffee area at Cornerstone Fellowship Church in Fountain Valley, California, where first-time visitors can chat with members of the church before heading into the church.

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Having covered two of three areas in how to shoot a great intro video for new visitors to your church Monday, here is the third area of how to complete such a project.

If (the video is) not on your website’s main page, it should not take more than one click from that main page to find it.

3. After Shooting

Grab some B-roll

Either before or after shooting the main body of the video, have the camera operator take several short shots of people doing some of the events you mention in the main video.
These shots don’t need audio, but they should feature people in a natural setting, not posed. Static or posed shots feel phony and kill momentum.

Editing

Using a simple video app on your phone, tablet or computer, drop a few shots of B-roll in at appropriate times.

If you don’t have someone who is comfortable with editing, it’s fine to use one long shot, but breaking it up a couple times with quick cuts brings the video to life. It’s also a great way to cover up awkward moments and edits.

Even if you don’t add B-roll, there’s one simple piece of editing that must be done. Clip a little bit off the front and back ends so it looks and feels clean. There should never be a shot of someone reaching to turn the camera on or off, waiting to get a cue to start, or staring awkwardly at the end. That’s fine in a personal Facebook video for friends and family, or even for a quick promo video in your car for current church members, but not when you’re inviting first-time guests.

Put it in up front on your church’s website and social media

After shooting and editing the video, feature it on your website and Facebook page. This video will be one of your church’s main front doors, so treat it that way.

If it’s not on your website’s main page, it should not take more than one click from that main page to find it, with an obvious tab or button saying something like About Us, New Here? or What To Expect.

Make it easily available for your church members to pass along to friends

This video is not the best way to get people to come to your church. The best way is, and will always be, personal invitation. But your members need tools that help them make that invitation, so make this tool as available as possible.

The easiest way for most of your church members to use it is to put it on your church Facebook and Instagram page, since they can share it easily from there.


More About Karl Vaters
Karl Vaters is the teaching pastor at Cornerstone Christian Fellowship, located in Fountain Valley, California, where he has ministered for 25 years. In addition, he has written two books about small churches; for his blog, Pivot, to go with being the founder of NewSmallChurch.com, a ministry that encourages, connects and equips innovative small church pastors.
Get in Touch: karlvaters@gmail.com    More by Karl Vaters

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Article Topics

Technology · Video · Cameras · Visual Arts · Filmmaking · Video Production · Team Management · Budgeting · B-Roll · Church · Church Building · Edits · Facebook · Members · All Topics

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