Team Development: Finding Your Creative Potential

Even though it may seem natural to repeat what is working, when it comes to creativity, we must constantly work our creative muscles and help find new avenues to creative success.

Team Development: Finding Your Creative Potential
No great artist has ever changed the world because they can trace other works really well. Just look at when someone who is a new artist, that they will grab a pencil and tracing paper. However, over time, there will need to be a moment where that individual will no longer use tracing paper, and instead begin to draw on their own.
Team Development: Finding Your Creative Potential
No great artist has ever changed the world because they can trace other works really well. Just look at when someone who is a new artist, that they will grab a pencil and tracing paper. However, over time, there will need to be a moment where that individual will no longer use tracing paper, and instead begin to draw on their own.

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Over the last year, I completed a book that focuses on the idea of finding your creative potential and unleashing your creative calling. The book, Creative Potential: Principles for Unleashing Your God-Given Calling, is available as of today, March 15.

Stop copying and start creating unique things as a response.

One of the concepts I share in the book is the idea of being confident in your calling. Here are some of those concepts about your calling and being confident:

1. Stop copying others.

Once you’ve found your creative calling, and you begin to feel the weight of doing something with that newfound burden, the pressure will expectedly begin to rise.

When that pressure rises, it will be natural to lean toward copying others as you pursue your own calling.

I want to encourage you to avoid doing this at all costs.

Stop copying and start creating unique things as a response.

Let me use the example of someone learning how to draw to illustrate this. At first, a new artist will grab a pencil and tracing paper. However, over time, there will need to be a moment where you no longer use tracing paper, and instead begin to draw on your own.

No great artist has ever changed the world because they can trace other works really well.

In the same light, no cover band has changed the world either. When we copy others, we’re robbing our own creative potential and instead trying to find someone else’s potential. This will kill our momentum, and never allows us to step into the fullness that God intended.

2. Stop comparing yourself to others.

Now that we don’t copy those around us, the next natural tendency will be to beat ourselves up, because we’re not “good enough” as everyone else. That’s because the metric you are using for yourself is out of balance with reality. You’re trying to compare your beginnings to someone else’s matured giftedness. That will result in shame, sadness, fear and will ultimately drive you to quit early.

Instead of comparing yourself to the “experts” in your field when you just get started in your calling, instead I want to recommend that you encourage and edify those who are better than you.

In doing so, you’ll be celebrating those around you and opening up a door to relationships with people a bit further down the road as you. These relationships will turn into mentorships and hopefully help you once more increase your creative potential.


More About Luke McElroy
Luke McElroy is the founder and visionary behind Orange Thread Media, the parent company to Orange Thread Live Events, TripleWide Media and SALT Conferences. Beyond his ability to cast vision for creativity in live events and worship environments, he’s passionate about mentoring, leadership and teamwork. Luke got his start in creative arts as a content producer creating animations for live events and worship services around the world. Some of the work he and his team created have been used by American Idol, Blake Shelton, Atlanta Falcons, and thousands of churches around the entire world.
Get in Touch: luke@orangethreadmedia.com    More by Luke McElroy

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