Video Cameras: Full HD or 4K?

With video camera manufacturers offering their newest models as 4K-capable, for many churches, Full HD might still be the better fit. Here are four Full HD models and four 4K models worthy of review.

Video Cameras: Full HD or 4K?
Included in the following slideshow are eight video camera models from four brands, with each brand highlighted here including one with Full HD capabilities, and another with 4K capabilities.
Video Cameras: Full HD or 4K?
Included in the following slideshow are eight video camera models from four brands, with each brand highlighted here including one with Full HD capabilities, and another with 4K capabilities.

Photos & Slideshow

Video Cameras: Full HD or 4K?

Video Cameras News

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Video Cameras Resource

Video Cameras Guide: Don’t Miss Out On Upgrades
Advanced camera features are being packaged into user-friendly prosumer systems all the time — new HD and 4K cameras with auto-zoom and auto-focus capabilities.
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So often, the challenge seems to be whether it’s a worthwhile investment to dive into the latest technology that is getting so much attention.

When it comes to video cameras, the pace of change to the latest technology seems to be so much of a blur that one can begin to think that it’s not humanly possible to keep up.

Recognize that there are already 8K-capable video cameras already in use, including the Red Weapon Vista Vision 8K (slated to be used in the filming of Guardians of the Galaxy 2, to be released next May), or the Hitachi SK-UHD-8060. Even so, though, because of their exorbitant cost, neither will likely be seen as reasonable investments for the vast majority of the tech-buying public, at least for the next few years.

Remember when 1080p (or Full HD), at 1920 x 1080 pixels, was marketed just a few years ago as the incredible technological achievement … How much things have changed.

With 4K, or Ultra HD cameras now readily available, resolution is taken to another level, with 4K offering four times as many pixels as compared to Full HD.

And unlike 8K, the price tag to purchase a 4K video camera won’t require one to win the lottery; oftentimes being just slightly more expensive than their Full HD cousins.

Remember when 1080p (or Full HD), at 1920 x 1080 pixels, was marketed just a few years ago as the incredible technological achievement … How much things have changed.

To get a sense of what is currently on the market for Full HD and 4K capable video cameras, we here at Worship Tech Director have included one Full HD and 4K model from each of four of the largest video camera manufacturers: Sony, JVC, Panasonic and Canon, for you to review.

Among the four Full HD cameras, the price can range anywhere from $2,399 to $2,999, while the four 4K models can run between $1,999 and $3,699. The differences in price between the two differing types of cameras under each brand is such that if a Full HD camera is on your radar, investigating 4K should at least be given a fair shake.

Beginning with the Canon XF105 Full HD professional camcorder, one of the first things that catches the eye is how small the unit is, beginning with it being just 2.4 pounds. By contrast, there are two Full HD models that tip the scales at a more hefty 5.3 pounds (Panasonic AG-AC130A and JVC GY-HM600U). Interestingly enough, a few of the 4K models reviewed here are actually lighter than the same brand’s Full HD model, particularly the Canon 4K entry, the XC10 4K, a light 2.1 pounds, while the Sony PXW Z150, the heaviest of the four 4K cameras, still weighs just 4 lbs., 3 oz.


More About Andres Caamano
Andres Caamano is the site editor for Worship Tech Director, which aims to inform tech directors, audio, video or lighting directors, creative directors, music directors and worship leaders about the latest technology, while also bringing to the forefront some of the most notable examples of leadership and completed projects that can be of benefit to houses of worship of all sizes. Andres joined WTD in 2015, and is focused on taking an engaged approach to the market; one that is encouraging, creative and set toward ministry purpose.
Get in Touch: acaamano@ehpub.com    More by Andres Caamano

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, January-February 2018
The January-February 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about the many steps a church had to take in the aftermath of a fire, and another involving a church making the jump to 4K.


Article Topics

Media · Slideshows · Technology · Video · 4K · Blu-Ray · Camcorders · Canon · CFast · Full HD · All Topics

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